Jewish Celebrations

Jewish Celebrations

  • Bat Mitzvah Date: January 13, 2013
    When Jewish girls turn twelve years old, they are considered to be “bnot mitzvah," or “daughters of mitzvah." This means that when these young ladies turn twelve years of age they celebrate not only being viewed by society as an adult, but, most importantly, they celebrate their religious accountability.  According to Judaism, when a girl turns twelve she is obligated in all the commandments incumbent upon Jewish women.
    Read More
  • Jewish Wedding Date: August 17, 2011
    1+1=2=1; to most of the world, this would seem like an egregious mathematical error. In Judaism, though, it is a simple axiom. When two people unite in marriage, they actually “become one flesh” (Genesis; 2:24). Another major notion by which Judaism does not hold, as opposed to the rest of the world, is that of falling in love at first sight. To be more exact, according to Judaism, marriage works in the following way: you find the right life-partner, a process that can be rather arduous, you marry the chosen one, you work on yourself in order to make the marriage work, and then you fall in love. Of course, one burning question remains: how do you find your soul-mate?
    Read More
  • Bris Date: August 17, 2011
    The Covenant of Circumcision or brit milah, also referred to as a bris, is a Jewish ritual performed on every male baby eight days after birth. This ritual is one of the more significant moments of a Jewish boy’s life and is meant to signify the relationship between the child and G-D and his connection to the Jewish community. The commandment of circumcision was the very first commandment given to the Jewish people and of all the ceremonies and commandments within Judaism it is probably the most cherished and observed.
    Read More
  • Bar Mitzvah Date: August 17, 2011
    From the age of thirteen, Jewish boys are considered adult men who are obligated in all mitzvos, or commandments. For this reason, on his thirteenth birthday, the Jewish boy is called a Bar Mitzvah," literally “son of mitzvah." We make a distinction between an “ish," or man, and a “non-ish" regarding the keeping of commandments. In several places our sages have interpreted “ish" as a time when the boy's body starts going through physical changes; prior to these changes, he is considered a minor and is not obligated in any commandment.
    Read More
World of Judaica, Internet Shopping, Sioux Falls, SD