Enormous damage was inflicted on the production of the film “Valley of Wolves: Palestine,” a film based on the Gaza Flotilla affair, during a mishandling of chemicals that burned two days worth of work.

Fate? The Turkish newspaper Milliyet reported today (Monday) that the producers of the film “Valley of Wolves: Palestine” now have to deal with a serious mishap as a fire destroyed a vast array of film negatives. The film, which deals with the Gaza Flotilla Affair, is expected to raise tensions between Israel and Turkey.

According to the report, an inappropriate use of chemicals caused the fire in the lab. Due to the mishap, at least two entire days of filming were lost. The filming was done with the head star and thousands of extras in addition to active scenes which included sets that replicated Palestinian towns.

The film’s producers, Pana Film, have refused to respond to the reports. Meanwhile, the assumption is that very heavy damage is involved, which will force the producers to film the destroyed scenes anew.

The film,  with a price tag of $10 million, was supposed to be screened in more than 100 countries on November 5. Turkish media has reported that the plot was going to focus around the Israeli raid on the Mavi Marmara on May 31, and the official trailer publicized in the last few days shows harsh photos of Israeli soldiers abusing Palestinians.

The details published at this point reveal that the film’s hero, Polet Almadar and his men, come to Israel in the background of the mission to stop the flotilla. The Turkish unit succeeds in trapping an Israeli officer named Moshe ben Eliezer, who claims he was the commander in charge of the raid.

Last January, another movie in the same “Valley of Wolves” series caused a storm between Israel and Turkey. The last season featured Mossad Agents kidnapping Turkish children to Israel in an attempt to forcibly convert them to Judaism. In the final dramatic scene, Turkish forces break in to the Israeli embassy and save a kidnapped child. The Israeli ambassador points a gun to the head of a Turkish maid who is holding the frightened child and threatens to shoot her. The Turkish officer then proceeds to heroically shoot the Israeli ambassador in the head as his blood pours down on the Israeli flag in the background.

Outraged by the film, Deputy Israeli Ambassador Danny Ayalon made then Turkish ambassador to Israel,  Ahmet Chelikol, sit on a lower chair and be photographed.

Ayalon later apologized to the Turkish ambassador for insulting him and Turkey.