Syrian protestors have been subject to violence from the Assad regime which could spread to Lebanon.

According to a report on the Al-Arabiyya network aired this morning, Hezbollah is considering conquering Beirut in a military coup if Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad’s government falls.

The report cited Hezbollah’s concerns regarding current turmoil in Syria and the popular uprising that gained steam in the last few months, especially since Syria is a close ally with the terrorist group.  Those concerns have led Hezbollah’s Secretary General Hassan Nasrallah to consider a “broad maneuver on the ground” which is likely to include taking over Parliament and involve the group’s military wing.  According to an unnamed source, Hezbollah’s armed cells “will quickly begin operating to seize control of Beirut's eastern and western parts”.

The source also said that Hezbollah will explain their action as preventing unrest that they blame on Israel and accuse Israel of fomenting in order to have a reason to attack Lebanon and destroy Hezbollah.  Other population blocs and groups in Lebanon such as the “Free Patriotic Movement” are expected to collaborate with the terrorist group in order to secure the country and prevent arms from escaping.

This recent report comes in the wake of a threat issued by Nasrallah nearly two weeks ago that any sort of attack on Syria or Iran would lead to a regional war.  Those threats, in conjunction with the IAEA report that Syria has been building a second nuclear reaction has led the entire world to focus on the country and demand the Assad regime change its tune.

Since the beginning of the year, numerous Arab states have undergone revolutions dubbed the “Arab Spring” that shook the world, starting with Egypt, Tunisia and Libya and spreading to Bahrain and other countries.  Syria’s unrest, which started several months ago, has been subjected to a particularly brutal response from the Assad regime which has left hundreds dead.  Syria is of particular concern to Israel because of its association with Iran and Syria, the latter of which Israel is still technically at war with although there has not been any cross-border violence for some time although numerous Syrians attempted to breach the border earlier this year, but were turned away via non-lethal means.